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Recommended Temperatures for Storing Wine

recommendedwinestoragetemperature

More goes into that perfect glass of wine than just choosing your favorite label and corresponding glass. To get the best flavor out of your bottles, it's necessary to store them correctly at their optimal temperatures. It is not just personal preference that comes into play, there is science that goes behind the internal body temperature and our pallets.

Storing wine correctly brings out their intended flavors, ensuring a balance of aroma, flavor, structure and alcohol. What are the optimal temperatures you ask? Keep reading to find out! Just keep in mind that the ideal wine temperature is by no means exact, and a few degrees here and there should not make a difference.


winestoragetemperatures

Red Wine

As you probably already know, the common rule of thumb for red wine is to keep it at room temperature. This is slightly flawed because room temperature can look very different for everyone. With that in mind, let's reevaluate.

Red wine is best kept and served slightly cool, at about 60 to 65°F. Slightly cooler than a typical "room temp", but much warmer than if you were to stick a bottle of red into the fridge. (Don't do that.) When red wine is served too cold, you will get excessive tannic and acidic notes. Served too warm and your bottle becomes lifeless.

Tip* Keep the bottle out if you plan on finishing, or place back in your wine fridge to keep the flavor best for drinking another day.


White & Rosé Wine

When you think of white wine, you generally think of it as cold right? This is because the perfect temperature for whites is between 50 and 60 °F, 55 °F being the general agreement for perfection. This is slightly warmer compared to a refrigerator, which is generally around 35-40 °F. If you are a big white or rosé drinker, then having a wine fridge on hand will make a world of difference.

Tip* Once the bottle is open, and you enjoy the flavor as is, then keep that bottle cold in a bucket of ice or place it back in the cooler. Allow the bottle to gradually warm up for a difference in aroma and taste.


Sparkling Wine

White or pink, bubbly wines are best cold, around 40°F to be exact. When the temperatures are closer to freezing, it allows for crispier carbonation, meaning the bubbles are distinct rather than foamy. Because the temp is so low, it is okay to leave sparkling wine in the fridge, but we of course recommend storing any wine in our wine coolers for best results and flavors.

Tip* Keep your open bottles on ice or place back in the fridge to keep the flavor and carbonations at their peak.


Proper Storage

Knowing the ideal temperatures for properly storing wine is very helpful information when making a wine cooler purchasing decision. If you generally stick to one type of wine (just red for example) then a Single Zone Wine Cooler is perfect for you. If you however like to drink all the varieties of wine, then we recommend checking out our Dual Zone Wine Coolers. They are impressive units that have the ability to control the temperature in the upper and lower zones. Generally, the upper zone can be set to 45-64 °F and the lower zone can be set to 41-61°F, allowing you to store your reds and whites all in one space!

When is it time to upgrade your wine storage conditions? How much did you spend last year on your wine habit? If a wine cooler costs less than 30 percent of your annual wine-buying budget, it may be time to think about protecting your investments.

Need help choosing a wine storage solution? Contact our product experts 800-710-9939 for help.


Did you know

If you store wine at temperatures higher than 70°F, the bottle will age 4 times quicker, become less desirable, or worst case, may become "cooked" resulting in loss of aromas and flavors.

On the opposite side, if you leave a bottle of wine in your fridge for too long (couple months), the cork may become dried out, which allows oxygen into the bottle, resulting in a loss of aromas and flavors.